Now that I am retired having been many years a magistrate with a long awareness of the declining freedoms enjoyed by the ordinary citizen and a corresponding fear of the big brother state`s ever increasing encroachment on civil liberties I hope that my personal observations within these general parameters will be of interest to those with an open mind. Having been blogging with this title for many years against the rules of the Ministry of Justice my new found freedom should allow me to be less inhibited in these observations.





Comments are usually moderated. However, I do not accept any legal responsibility for the content of any comment. If any comment seems submitted just to advertise a website it will not be published.

Thursday, 15 September 2016

DISQUALIFY MOBILE PHONE DRIVERS

Just over three years ago I posted that increased fines for using a mobile phone whilst driving would be ineffective in controlling this dangerous occupation.  Increasing the number of penalty points was I opined the only sensible deterrent. The problem is getting worse. In its latest report the RAC Foundation states that in road accidents in Great Britain 240 people were killed where one driver was over the drink/drive limit. In the RAC Report on Motoring published today it is stated that "a significant minority of motorists (31%) admit to having used a handheld phone to make or receive calls while driving at some point in the past 12 months".  Government figures indicate that between 2012 and 2014  67 people were killed on our roads because a driver was using a mobile phone. The penalties for alcohol related driving offences are well known; disqualification on first offence for twelve months. Through that deterrence and social changes drink driving and its terrible consequences has been reduced. By comparison the level of fines imposed has had little influence.  

Today it is announced that on the spot fines for the offence of using a mobile phone whilst driving will rise from the current £100 to £150 and penalty points for car and van drivers will increase from three to four.    With the numbers of police patrols both on foot and in car much reduced in our cities it is unlikely that more offenders will be stopped in what is the first step towards punishment.  

The only way to curb this menace is to disqualify from driving for  three months for first offence .
A11) Final estimates for 2014 show that 240 people were killed in accidents in Great Britain where at least one driver was over the drink drive limit. - See more at: http://www.racfoundation.org/motoring-faqs/safety#sthash.v4z2tllE.dpuf
A11) Final estimates for 2014 show that 240 people were killed in accidents in Great Britain where at least one driver was over the drink drive limit. - See more at: http://www.racfoundation.org/motoring-faqs/safety#sthash.v4z2tllE.dpuf
A11) Final estimates for 2014 show that 240 people were killed in accidents in Great Britain where at least one driver was over the drink drive limit. - See more at: http://www.racfoundation.org/motoring-faqs/safety#sthash.v4z2tllE.dpuf

5 comments:

  1. And to add to this discussion about concentration behind the wheel we should also ban the use of earphones and headphones both by all motorists and particularly cyclists. It should also be an offence to smoke in the car. Trying to enforce a ban on eating and drinking is likely to be more difficult but all these issues must be considered. Just about everyone puts a seat belt on when they get into a car these days thank goodness. It wasn't always the case but public behaviour can be changed and it then becomes accepted practice for all. This current slaughter cannot go on.

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  2. Careful now, more laws with less enforcement just breeds contempt. It's already illegal to smoke in any shared vehicle, which has done nothing to stop the clouds billowing from every white van up and down the land.

    On this subject, I've seen a marked police van stop square in a cycle box, with a mobile clamped firmly to the driver's face. This, on a busy city centre street full of cycles and pedestrians crossing.

    I don't hold out much hope of stricter enforcement, although Lord knows that many coppers love to excoriate for doing as they do.

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  3. Perhaps a better deterrent would be if they were stopped and the sim confiscated. Not expensive to replace but inconvenient!

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  4. Why not take the phone from offenders. Cars with no insurance are taken. With the latest must have mobiles costing £500-600 the risk of losing it would be more of a deterrent

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  5. PACE 1984 would already allow for seizure. There would be grounds to prevent evidence tampering, particularly if the accusation is contested at the scene ("Idindunuffin").

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